Legislative notebook: TV commercial blasts Dayton medical marijuana stand

A group supporting medical marijuana is buying television commercial time to attack Minnesota Gov. Mark Dayton’s opposition to a bill stalled in the Legislature.

The spot features a St. Paul mother and her 5-year-old son who suffers from seizures that medical marijuana advocates say could be eased if the plant were allowed to be used.

The commercial by Minnesotans for Compassionate Care was scheduled to air during Wednesday’s “Tonight Show” and “Late Show,” then to be on some Thursday morning shows.

The organization on Thursday plans to deliver a petition to Dayton’s office signed by more than 4,900 Minnesotans calling for him to allow the medical marijuana bill to advance.

The bill by Rep. Carly Melin, D-Hibbing, stalled in a legislative committee after Dayton said he would not sign a bill allowing plant marijuana to be used to treat seizures and extreme pain, two things advocates say marijuana could ease.

Dayton said he cannot support Melin’s bill until law enforcement and medical organizations back it.

Law enforcement groups oppose the bill because it would allow the marijuana plant to be used. They say they could back the bill if it were changed only to use chemicals from the plant as medicine.

Medical groups oppose the measure because marijuana has not undergone extensive scientific tests as required by other medicines. Dayton proposed that Mayo Clinic conduct such an extensive study to see how a marijuana extract affect 200 children with seizures.

The commercial can be seen at http://youtu.be/vdn5NO2s0Nk.

 

Bill passes to protect data

Minnesota senators unanimously passed a bill to crack down on public employees who improperly use individuals’ private data, such as driver’s licenses.

“It does provide some accountability,” Sen. Scott Dibble, D-Minneapolis, said, before the 66-0 vote.

The Senate-passed bill is slightly different than one the House passed 132-0 last year, so the House must reconsider the bill before it heads to the governor for his signature.

Dibble’s bill follows reports about various public employees with access to driver’s licenses looked at information when with no official reason. Many of those accused of improperly calling up the data were men who looked at private information of well-known women such as television news reporters.

While the Dibble bill would increase penalties for improper access, he added that “more work is going to have to be done at some point in the future.”

The measure requires that private data only is available who need it for their jobs, and they can only access it while on duty.

 

Retirement funds would get aid

Minnesota legislators are looking into ways to help two teacher retirement funds.

An overall pension bill that nears a full House vote would provide $15 million a year to ensure a successful merger of the financially troubled Duluth Teachers Retirement Fund Association and the Teachers Retirement Association, an organization serving teachers across the state. The bill also would provide $7 million annually to keep the St. Paul Teachers Retirement Fund Association fiscally sound.

The money involved with the Duluth fund would continue for 24 years. Leaders of that fund have told lawmakers that a better financial picture is doubtful because more retirees are getting benefits than there are current teachers to fund the system.

 

Disability aid part of big bill

Rep. Rod Hamilton lost a Wednesday effort to allow Minnesota representatives to vote on raising state aid to people who care for the disabled.

On a 68-59 vote, the House rejected the Mountain Lake Republican’s proposal to immediately debate and vote on the plan to increase funding 5 percent for home health care providers. That means the provision will be voted on Thursday as part of a budget bill that updates a $39 billion, two-year budget lawmakers passed a year ago.

The Thursday bill includes all budget changes, such as increasing funding for transportation, education and other programs.

House Majority Leader Erin Murphy, D-St. Paul, said that the usual way to alter an already-passed budget, including when Republicans controlled the House, is to lump all budget changes in one big bill.

“Let’s have a clean vote,” Hamilton responded.

Republicans generally support the 5 percent increase, but could be tempted to vote against the budget bill because they oppose much of the new spending it contains.

“We are being forced to choose whether or not we can support every word in a 600-page bill simply because we support people with disabilities,” Hamilton said.

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