Pipelines allow Legislature to flow to end

Minnesota Senate

By Don Davis

Pipe dreams expressed early in the 2014 Minnesota legislative session gave way to pipelines as it neared an end Friday night.

The House adjourned for the year at 8:59 p.m. Friday, with the Senate following at 10:13 p.m. after two pipeline issues were settled in the final day. Oil-carrying pipelines, mostly in northern Minnesota, and southwest Minnesota’s water pipeline project received funding after talks among legislative leaders and Gov. Mark Dayton produced results that allowed for a smooth session close.

House Speaker Paul Thissen, D-Minneapolis, declared the 2014 session that began Feb. 25 and the 2013 session legislative successes.

“I think we had a productive two years, this year building on the work of last year,” Thissen said.

He pointed out measures lawmakers passed throughout the session such as raising the minimum wage, a measure to prevent school bullying and approving two tax-cut bills.

Republicans could not leave the Capitol quickly enough.

“Minnesota state government has not served Minnesotans well,” House Minority Leader Kurt Daudt, R-Crown, said, noting that Democrats control the House, Senate and governor’s office.

“As a result of this (two-year) session, we have one of the highest tax increases in state history,” Daudt said. “We have the highest budget increase in state history.”

While leaders of the two parties disagreed on the outcome of the 88th Minnesota legislative session, there was relatively little partisan debate Friday as work wound down.

Lawmakers Friday approved more than $1 billion in public works projects, legalized medical marijuana, lowered some taxes and told the state lottery to get out of online scratch-off game sales.

Pipelines took the spotlight in late-session negotiations.

A budget bill that wrapped up early Friday includes $3.75 million to increase training and buy equipment for first responders such as fire departments to deal with potential oil spills from pipelines. The money would come from assessments placed on pipeline companies.

The bill already contained more than $8 million for training and equipment where oil-carrying trains travel. The rail provision also would add two or three railroad inspectors to the one the state already employs.

About 900,000 Minnesotans live near oil pipelines, and many more live near railroad tracks where oil trains travel. Most oil trains go through Moorhead, St. Cloud and the Twin Cities, but trains do travel other parts of the state.

House Transportation Finance Chairman Frank Hornstein, D-Minneapolis, said a key part of the bill requires the state Public Safety Department to study oil transportation safety — including trains, pipelines, trucks and boats — and provide information next year to legislators about what else needs to be done.

The House wanted the pipeline safety provision, but the Senate included no funding. Budget negotiators opted to include pipeline safety after Dayton piped up and demanded it.

The bill containing the oil pipeline safety items was an overall budget bill that increases spending $262 million in a $39 billion, two-year budget. Among its other provisions:

– Home and community-based health care workers and rural nursing homes all will get more state funding.

– Public education will receive $54 million more, including funds to increase early-childhood learning for more than 1,000 youths.

– Broadband high-speed Internet expansion efforts will get a $20 million boost.

– More than $31 million will be spent on a road program known as Corridors of Commerce.

– Another $10 million will be spent to fix potholes.

Dayton told lawmakers that he wanted money for the Lewis and Clark water system to serve southwestern Minnesota. Legislators obliged by approving $22 million from the state budget reserve to build the pipeline from the South Dakota line to Luverne and giving local governments authority to borrow $45 million to extend the system through several counties, with the state paying two-thirds of the loan costs.

“It is very important to the governor, first of all,” Thissen said of Lewis and Clark. “He gets a lot of credit for this making its way through.”

Thissen said the Lewis and Clark funding deal opened the door for adjournment.

“The main thing that happened in the last 24 to 36 hours is we put our heads together and figured out a better way to fund Lewis and Clark …” Thissen said. “It broke everything loose and everything fell into place.”

Also as the session neared its end, lawmakers voted to restrict online sales of state lottery games. While lotto-type tickets would remain available, the online version of scratch-off games the lottery introduced in February would disappear if the governor opts to sign the bill into law.

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