Political Chatter: Campaigns Deliver Urgent Messages

By Don Davis

It is breathless time for political campaigns.

In what reminds one of an old-time messenger trying to catch his breath when delivering urgent news, the campaigns fit in as much drama as possible during this time of a campaign. The term “breaking” is used in many an email subject line, followed by a comment in all capital letters that seems to indicate the sky is falling.

Take, for instance, an email from Gov. Mark Dayton’s campaign seeking money from supporters.

With bright yellow highlighting in the background, the solicitation begins, and the last sentence underlined and in blue type: “BREAKING FINANCE UPDATE: Tea Party opponent Jeff Johnson is outraising Governor Mark Dayton! Four years of progress is at risk: Give now to save our progress with Mark Dayton!”

In the exact same format, Executive Director Corey Day of the Democratic-Farmer-Labor Party declares: “ACTION NEEDED: MPR reports the Minnesota Business Partnership – which includes CEOs from the state’s biggest corporations – is laser-focused on helping Republicans take control of the Minnesota House. Give right now to defend our DFL majorities, and your gift will be MATCHED dollar-for-dollar!”

Carl Kuhl of Republican Mike McFadden’s U.S. Senate campaign was a bit less dramatic: “Senator Al Franken is getting a lot of help from Washington D.C. friends like Senator Harry Reid and Senator Elizabeth Warren. In fact, it was just announced Elizabeth Warren’s Super PAC is raising money and creating a ‘firewall’ to protect her friend Al Franken. Because of this D.C. money help, Senator Franken is beating us in fundraising, but we’re closing the gap and need your help to finish this month strong.”

Like so many of the donation-seeking emails, Kuhl begs supporters to “act before it is too late.”

A closer look at Dayton’s situation leaves the Democratic governor  looking in better shape than his campaign’s email may indicate.

While Dayton emphasized that Johnson outraised Dayton in the last campaign finance reporting period, the incumbent governor still has more money than the Republican. And while a recent poll gave Dayton a 12-point lead, the fundraising letter emphasized the 20 percent of voters who apparently have not decided between Johnson and Dayton.

“With so much at stake – 162,000 new jobs, a higher minimum wage and affordable college tuition – we CANNOT fall behind now,” the Dayton email breathlessly declared. “We have to fight back.”

‘Keep off trigger’

The Minnesota Gun Owners Political Action Committee says it wants to keep Minnesotans safe by paying for gun training classes for U.S. Rep. Rick Nolan.

A picture of the Democrat who serves northeast and east-central Minnesota attracted lots of social media attention because he had a finger on the trigger of a gun.

“The basic rules of firearms safety, taught to students as young as 12 in … hunter safety classes, state clearly that one’s finger should be kept off the trigger until ready to shoot,” committee Executive Director Bryan Strawser said. “Mr. Nolan’s actions are unsafe and dangerous.”

Strawser’s committee offered to pay for firearms training for Nolan at Mills Fleet Farm indoor shooting range in Baxter. Of course, Nolan’s Republican opponent in his re-election campaign is Fleet Farm official Stewart Mills.

Who gets the credit?

It is election season and every politician’s comment is closely scrutinized.

A case in point is something re-election candidate Gov. Mark Dayton, a Democrat, said about the Lewis and Clark project that is to bring southwestern Minnesota water.

“The area’s Republican legislators gave it lip service,” Dayton said. “We gave it $72 million.”

Dayton should not be surprised the “the area’s Republican legislators” did not take kindly to the comment.

“Gov. Mark Dayton’s comments today on the Lewis and Clark project don’t hold water,” Sen. Bill Weber of Luverne and Rep. Rod Hamilton of Mountain Lake said in a joint statement. “It’s outrageous he is taking credit for this project when the opposite is true.

“Everyone agreed the Lewis and Clark water project was worthy of funding, but Gov. Dayton and the Democrats repeatedly used the project as leverage to get Republicans to agree to more borrowing for wasteful projects.”

Weber and Hamilton accuse Dayton of playing “political games with basic human needs like having sufficient potable water in our communities.”

GOP lawmakers were working on their colleagues at the end of the spring’s legislative session as Lewis and Clark became the major hang-up to adjourning for the year. At one point, a weary but happy Hamilton sat at his back-row House seat, relieved that House Speaker Paul Thissen, D-Minneapolis, had just agreed to a solution those in the southwest could live with.

Tuition freeze promoted

Minnesota House Democrats have traveled the state in recent days promoting their plan to freeze college tuition until 2017.

President Eric Kaler of the University of Minnesota praised the effort, a rare comment by someone in his position about a political initiative.

“We’re pleased that leaders and members of the Minnesota House DFL support that goal and vision and we look forward to working with all members, the Senate and the governor to achieve that goal,” Kaler said.

But Kaler’s comment came with a warning: “If we do not get sufficient funding to support this freeze, the Board of Regents is prepared to raise tuition, as needed, to fill the gap.”

Looking heavenward

Well-known national political pundit Stuart Rothenberg wrote in Politico that U.S. Sen. Al Franken has a pretty good chance to be re-elected in Minnesota.

Republican challenger Mike McFadden probably needs “divine intervention to have any chance of winning,” Rothenberg wrote.

Dayton seeks rail data

Gov. Mark Dayton has asked about 300 communities near railroads that carry oil trains to tell him how increased train traffic and oil going through their towns affect budgets and quality of life.

At five meetings about railroad oil safety, with a sixth planned for Duluth, local leaders have told Dayton stories of long trains being parked in their communities for hours and that their public safety workers are not prepared if there is an oil train derailment.

“In my meetings with local leaders across the state this summer, it became clear that increased traffic on our railways is having real and costly impacts on Minnesota communities,” Dayton said. “This survey will help identify those challenges, and provide a roadmap for the state to address these problems in the 2015 legislative session.”

Broadband grants ready

Minnesota officials are accepting applications for grants to expand high-speed Internet in areas that lack speed.

The service, also known as broadband, is especially lacking in rural Minnesota, where officials say it puts them at a disadvantage to those in cities.

The Legislature and governor approved spending $20 million on broadband grants earlier this year, with up to $5 per grant.